Clifford Jordan

Clifford Jordan

born on 2/9/1931 in Chicago, IL, United States

died on 27/3/1993 in New York City, NY, United States

Clifford Jordan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Clifford Laconia Jordan (September 2, 1931 – March 27, 1993) was an American jazz tenor saxophone player. While in Chicago, he performed with Max Roach, Sonny Stitt, and some rhythm and blues groups. He moved to New York City in 1957, after which he recorded three albums for Blue Note.[1] He recorded with Horace Silver, J.J. Johnson, and Kenny Dorham, among others. He was part of the Charles Mingus Sextet, with Eric Dolphy, during its 1964 European tour.[1]

Jordan toured Africa with Randy Weston, and performed in Paris while living in Belgium.[2] In later years, he led his own groups, performed with Cedar Walton's quartet Eastern Rebellion,[3] and led a big band.[1]

Jordan was married to Shirley Jordan, a designer and former owner of Clothing Manufacturing Corporation in New York.[2] He later married Sandy Jordan (née Williams), a graphic artist and Honorary Founders Board member of the Jazz Foundation of America.[4]

Death

Jordan died of lung cancer at the age of 61 in New York City.[5]

Discography

As leader

  • 1957: Blowing in from Chicago (Blue Note) with John Gilmore
  • 1957: Cliff Jordan (Blue Note)
  • 1957: Jenkins, Jordan and Timmons (New Jazz) with John Jenkins and Bobby Timmons
  • 1957: Cliff Craft (Blue Note)
  • 1960: Spellbound (Riverside)
  • 1961: A Story Tale (Jazzland) with Sonny Red
  • 1961: Starting Time (Jazzland)
  • 1962: Bearcat (Jazzland)
  • 1965: These are My Roots: Clifford Jordan Plays Leadbelly (Atlantic)
  • 1968: Soul Fountain (Vortex)
  • 1972: In the World (Strata-East)
  • 1973: Glass Bead Games (Strata-East)
  • 1974: Half Note (SteepleChase)
  • 1975: Night of the Mark VII (Muse)
  • 1975: On Stage Vol. 1 (SteepleChase)
  • 1975: On Stage Vol. 2 (SteepleChase)
  • 1975: On Stage Vol. 3 (SteepleChase)
  • 1975: Firm Roots (SteepleChase)
  • 1975: The Highest Mountain (SteepleChase)
  • 1976: Remembering Me-Me (Muse)
  • 1977: Inward Fire (Muse)
  • 1978: The Adventurer (Muse)
  • 1978: Hello, Hank Jones (Eastworld)
  • 1981: Hyde Park After Dark (Bee Hive) with Victor Sproles, Von Freeman, Cy Touff
  • 1984: Repetition (Soul Note)
  • 1984: Dr. Chicago (Bee Hive)
  • 1984: Two Tenor Winner (Criss Cross) with Junior Cook
  • 1985: The Rotterdam Session (Audio Daddio) with Philly Joe Jones and James Long
  • 1986: Royal Ballads (Criss Cross)
  • 1987: Live at Ethell's (Mapleshade)
  • 1989: Blue Head (Candid, 1990) with David "Fathead" Newman
  • 1989: Masters from Different Worlds (Mapleshade) with Ran Blake and Julian Priester
  • 1990: Four Play (DIW/Columbia) with Richard Davis, James Williams & Ronnie Burrage
  • 1989-90: The Mellow Side of Clifford Jordan (Mapleshade)
  • 1990: Play What You Feel (Mapleshade)
  • 1991: Down Through the Years (Milestone)

As sideman

With Paul Chambers

  • Paul Chambers Quintet (1957)

With Sonny Clark

  • Sonny Clark Quintets (1957, the three tracks with Clifford Jordan reissued on My Conception, 2008 CD)

With Richard Davis

  • Epistrophy & Now's the Time (Muse, 1972)
  • Dealin' (Muse, 1973)

With Eric Dolphy

  • Iron Man (1963)
  • Conversations (1963)

With Art Farmer

  • Mirage (Soul Note, 1982)
  • You Make Me Smile (Soul Note, 1984)
  • Something to Live For: The Music of Billy Strayhorn (Contemporary, 1987)
  • Blame It on My Youth (Contemporary, 1988)
  • Ph.D. (Contemporary, 1989)
  • Live at Sweet Basil (Evidence, 1992)

With Dizzy Gillespie

  • To Bird with Love (Telarc, 1992)

With Slide Hampton

  • Roots (Criss Cross, 1985)

With John Hicks and Elise Wood

  • Luminous (Nilva, 1985)

With Andrew Hill

  • Shades (1986)

With J. J. Johnson

  • J.J. Inc.

With Charles McPherson

  • Con Alma! (Prestige, 1965)

With Carmen McRae

  • Any Old Time (1986)
  • Carmen Sings Monk (1988)

With Charles Mingus

  • Mingus in Europe Volume I (Enja, 1964 [1980])
  • Mingus in Europe Volume II (Enja, 1964 [1980])
  • Charles Mingus Sextet with Eric Dolphy Cornell 1964
  • Astral Weeks
  • Town Hall Concert (Jazz Workshop, 1964)
  • Revenge! (1964)
  • Right Now: Live at the Jazz Workshop (Fantasy, 1964)

With Mingus Dynasty

  • Live at the Theatre Boulogne-Billancourt/Paris, Vol. 1 (Soul Note, 1988)
  • Live at the Theatre Boulogne-Billancourt/Paris, Vol. 2 (Soul Note, 1988)

With Lee Morgan

  • Here's Lee Morgan (Vee-Jay, 1960)
  • Expoobident (Vee-Jay, 1960)
  • Take Twelve (Jazzland, 1962)

With Pony Poindexter

  • Pony's Express (Epic, 1962)

With Freddie Redd

  • Lonely City (Uptown, 1985 [1989])

With Dizzy Reece

With Max Roach

  • Percussion Bitter Sweet (Impulse!, 1961)
  • It's Time (Impulse!, 1962)
  • Speak, Brother, Speak! (Fantasy, 1962)

With Sahib Shihab

  • The Jazz We Heard Last Summer (Savoy, 1957)

With Horace Silver

  • Further Explorations (Blue Note, 1958)

With Charles Tolliver

  • Music Inc. (Strata-East, 1971)

With Mal Waldron

  • What It Is (Enja, 1981)

With Cedar Walton

  • Spectrum (Prestige, 1968)
  • The Electric Boogaloo Song (Prestige, 1969)
  • A Night at Boomers, Vol. 1 (Muse, 1973)
  • A Night at Boomers, Vol. 2 (Muse, 1973)
  • The Pentagon (East Wind, 1976)

With Joe Zawinul

  • Money in the Pocket (Atlantic, 1967)

References

  1. ^ a b c Biography at AllMusic by Scott Yanow
  2. ^ a b Simmons, Art (April 16, 1970). Johnson, John H., ed. "Paris Scratchpad". JET. Chicago: Johnson. XXXVIII (3): 33. ISSN 0021-5996. Retrieved August 3, 2010. Arranger, composer, saxophonist Clifford Jordan, a Chicagoan who now lives in Belgium with his wife, designer Shirley Jordan (a former owner of Clothing Manufacturing Corp., New York City), closed at the Chat Qui Peche here. He is a partner in a new record firm, Frontier Records, which records legendary musicians who have not had the proper exposure. Jordan toured Africa with Randy Weston recently...
  3. ^ Yanow, Scott (2010). "AllMusic". Eastern Rebellion. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved December 14, 2017.
This page was last modified 28.03.2019 02:49:39

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