Stephen Albert

born on 6/2/1941 in New York City, NY, United States

died on 27/12/1992 in Cape Cod, MA, United States

Stephen Albert

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Stephen Albert (6 February 1941 27 December 1992)[1] was an American composer.

Biography

Born in New York City, Albert began his musical training on the piano, French horn, and trumpet as a youngster. He first studied composition at the age of 15 with Elie Siegmeister,[2] and enrolled two years later at the Eastman School of Music, where he studied with Bernard Rogers. Following composition lessons in Stockholm with Karl-Birger Blomdahl, Albert studied with Joseph Castaldo at the Philadelphia Musical Academy (BM 1962); in 1963 he worked with George Rochberg at the University of Pennsylvania. From 1985 to 1988 he worked as the Seattle Symphony's composer-in-residence.[1][3]

His notable students include Daniel Asia.

Albert was killed in an automobile accident on Cape Cod in December 1992.

Awards and honors

Stephen Albert won the 1985 Pulitzer Prize in Music for his symphony RiverRun. He won a Grammy Award in 1995 in the Best Classical Contemporary Composition category for "Cello Concerto" as performed by Yo-Yo Ma.

The slow movement and emotional core of Christopher Rouse's Second Symphony, 1993, is dedicated to the memory of Stephen Albert, who was a colleague and close friend of Rouse. The work is recorded on TELARC CD-80452, issued in 1997.

Works

Orchestral

  • Anthems and Processionals (1988) - 16 minutes
  • Into Eclipse (chamber with voice version) (1981) - 30 minutes
  • Symphony No. 1 RiverRun (1983) - 33 minutes
  • Symphony No. 2 (1992) - 30 minutes (orchestration completed by Sebastian Currier)
  • Tapioca Pudding (1991) - 2 minutes

Concertante

  • Concerto for Violoncello and Orchestra (1990) - 30 minutes
  • Distant Hills (orchestra version) (1989) - 31 minutes
  • Flower of the Mountain from Distant Hills (orchestra version) (1985) - 16 minutes
  • In Concordiam (1986) - 17 minutes
  • Into Eclipse (orchestra with voice version) (1981) - 30 minutes
  • Suns Heat from Distant Hills (orchestra version) (1989) - 15 minutes
  • Wind Canticle (1991) - 14 minutes
  • Wolf Time (1968) - 20 minutes

Ensemble (7 or more players)

  • Distant Hills (chamber version) (1989) - 31 minutes
  • Flower of the Mountain from Distant Hills (chamber version) (1985) - 16 minutes
  • Suns Heat from Distant Hills (chamber version) (1989) - 15 minutes
  • TreeStone (1983) - 45 minutes

Chamber

  • Tribute (1988) - 9 minutes

Choral

  • Bacchae: A Ceremony in Music (1967) - 8 minutes

Vocal

  • Ecce Puer (1992) - 6 minutes
  • Rilke Song - On Nights Like This (1991) - 5 minutes
  • The Stone Harp (1988) - 14 minutes
  • To Wake the Dead (1977) - 25 minutes
  • Wedding Songs (1964) - 10 minutes

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Randel, Don Michael, ed. (1996). Albert, Stephen (Joel) The Harvard biographical dictionary of music, p. 11, Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard Univ. Press.
  2. (1996) Albert, Stephen Joel Who Was Who in America, 1993-1996, vol. 11, New Providence, N.J.: Marquis Who's Who.
  3. Stephen Albert. G. Schirmer Inc (October 1996). Retrieved on 28 December 2011.

External links

Interviews

This page was last modified 08.09.2013 23:52:27

This article uses material from the article Stephen Albert from the free encyclopedia Wikipedia and it is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.