Music database

Musician

Wilhelm Bernhard Molique

born on 7/10/1802 in Nürnberg, Bayern, Germany

died on 10/5/1869 in Cannstatt bei Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany

Wilhelm Bernhardt Molique

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Wilhelm Bernhardt Molique (7 October 1802  – 10 May 1869) was a German violinist and composer.

He was born in Nuremberg and learned to play the violin at the University of Munich under Pietro Rovelli. In 1826 he became music-director at Stuttgart.

As a composer Molique was unapologetically self-taught. His music displays the influence of Beethoven, Mozart, Mendelssohn and, especially, Louis Spohr. The then radical developments represented by Berlioz (who publicly praised his violin playing) and the New German school (Neudeutschen Schule) left Molique untouched, however.

His Cello Concerto was successfully played in Baden-Baden, by Léon Jacquard, conducted by Hector Berlioz, on August 27, 1860. He also wrote some charming songs. He died in Cannstatt in 1869.

Other selected compositions

  • Chamber music
    • String Quartets, Opp. 16 (in G) and 17 (the latter in C minor)[1]
    • Three String Quartets, Op. 18[2]
    • First grand trio concertante for piano, violin and violoncello, Op. 27[3]
    • Sixth String Quartet, Op. 28 in F minor[4]
    • Quintet for flute, violin, violas, violoncello, Op. 35, D major[5]
    • Seventh String Quartet in B-flat, Op. 42 (published 1854)[6][7]
    • Eighth String Quartet, Op. 44 in A minor (published by Kistner of Leipzig by 1853)[8]
    • Second Piano Trio, Op. 52 in F (published 1858)[9][7]
    • Sonata for Concertina and Piano, Op. 57 (1857)
    • Piano Quartet, Op. 71 in E-flat (published 1870)[9][7]
  • Concertante works
    • Concertino in F minor for violin, Op. 1[10]
    • Violin Concerto no. 1 in E Op. 4 (published 1830)[3][10][7]
    • Violin Concerto no. 2 in A major, Op. 9 (published 1833)[3][11][7]
    • Violin Concerto no. 3 in D minor, Op. 10[12]
    • Violin Concerto no. 4 in D, Op. 14 (published 1839)[13]
    • Violin Concerto no. 5 in A minor, Op. 21 (published 1845)[14][7]
    • Violin Concerto no. 6, Op. 30 (ca. 1847?)[3]
    • Cello Concerto in D, Op.45 (published 1854)[7]
    • Flute Concerto in D minor, Op. 69[15]
    • Clarinet Concerto in F minor, 1824[16]
  • Oratorio
    • Abraham, op. 65.[17]
  • Liturgical
    • Mass in F minor, op. 22.(published 1846.)[18][7]

Notes

  1. Both in Bloomington Music Library, Indiana.
  2. Quartets 4 and 5 recorded on cpo in 2005
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Library of the Univ Bibl Johann Christian Senckenberg
  4. Also in Bloomington Music Library
  5. Permalink for 1978 Edition of Molique Flute Quintet at Cornell. Retrieved on 2009-01-14.
  6. Persistent Link to University of Illinois Library Page for New Merton Music Edition. Retrieved on 2009-01-14.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 Dates from searches at Hofmeisters Monatsbericht online (http://www.hofmeister.rhul.ac.uk ).
  8. At Bloomington Music Library, Indiana
  9. 9.0 9.1 Juilliard School Library.
  10. 10.0 10.1 Classical Composers Molique Site. Retrieved on 2009-01-14.
  11. Newberry Library Catalog Listing
  12. Persistent Link to New England Conservatory's Fenway Libraries Entry for Violin Concerto 3 Reduced Score. Retrieved on 2009-01-14.
  13. At Yale University Library.
  14. Los Angeles Public Library.
  15. Cornell Permalink for 1940s Edition of Molique Flute Concerto. Retrieved on 2009-01-14.
  16. Permalink at BSB (Bavarian Library) for Clarinet Concerto. Retrieved on 2009-01-14.
  17. Permalink for Abraham Oratorio at Veech Library. Retrieved on 2009-01-14.
  18. Library of Congress listing.

Sources

  • This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, a publication in the public domain.

External links

  • Bernhard IMSLP - International Music Score Library Project's {{{cname}}} page.
This page was last modified 16.09.2010 10:55:13

This article uses material from the article Wilhelm Bernhardt Molique from the free encyclopedia Wikipedia and it is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License.